Wetum and James Bay Winter Road Street View Collect Project March 4-8, 2019

I attended Google Earth Outreach’s Geo for Good conference for the first time in October 2016. This workshop is intended for nonprofit mapping and technology specialists (of which I am not – I am just fortunate to be able to learn in these fields); and Google Earth Outreach is a program that helps provide nonprofits and public benefit organizations with knowledge and resources to visualize their cause and tell their story in Google’s mapping tools. I had the opportunity to attend again in 2018, and met Tawanda Kanhema. Originally from Zimbabwe, Tawanda has lived and worked in the Bay area, California for the past 10 years and recently traveled back to his home to put Zimbabwe on Google Maps/Street View.

We chatted about where I am from (northeastern Ontario), and where I work (CreeGeo/Mushkegowuk Council Information Services). I remember talking about the importance of the Winter Roads to connect remote communities in the colder months (in warm months, they are fly-in), and lamenting the fact that Wetum and James Bay Winter roads were not on Google Street View (not to mention any of the communities). If these roads were on Google Maps, it would afford anyone using this service to be a virtual tourist, and take a virtual drive up these roads from anywhere in the world. Not only that, but my hope would be to provide education to others about why these roads are integral to Mushkegowuk communities, and as a thank you to all of the people who work hard to maintain these roads during its season.

With some planning, this project is coming to fruition on Monday, March 4th. We leave Timmins Monday morning and will be on the road visiting the communities of Moosonee, Moose Factory, Attawapiskat, Kashechewan and Fort Albany throughout the week. We have welcomed community members to share stories about the winter road and will also show students the equipment being used and hopefully ignite some curiosity! Thank you to the above communities and to Mushkegowuk Council for allowing us to engage in this opportunity.

Wetum Road / James Bay Winter Road Street View project travelers:

Tawanda Kanhema – Photographer, Kanhema Photo

Alan Sanchez – Filmmaker, Sanchez Media LLC

Melissa Lavoie – CreeGeo

Ed Sutherland – CreeGeo

Michaela Paradis – CreeGeo

Dr. David Pearson – Professor, School of Environmental Sciences, Laurentian University

See the Twitter post below for our travel schedule!

 

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Mobile Virtual Reality Experiences

For my current UBC MET course (ETEC 523 – Mobile and Open Learning), the first assignment is to publish an original media-based critical analysis of an emerging facet of mobility. I chose to use Adobe Spark Page to create the resource, as I know how mobile responsive it is, and my topic was how to use apps to support and produce immersive mobile narrative-making. I smashed a few apps together but had to include a tour building software only available on desktop – Google, if you’re reading this (ha), please develop a mobile editor for Tour Creator! This proposed platform allows students to use free software and apps to create virtual reality scenes / tours – the potential for creativity is endless. At the end, students can publish their tours and view them using VR goggles.

IMG_4068
Cardboard VR Goggles, Best Buy’s Insignia brand (these often go on sale for $5.00)

Click below to see how Cardboard Camera, Google Drive, Tour Creator and Google Expeditions work together to create mobile virtual reality experiences!

Mobile Virtual Reality Experiences

GPS and Geotagged Photos in Fort Albany

CreeGeo visited Fort Albany’s Peetabeck Academy School today to deliver a workshop with Mrs. Reuben’s Gr. 7/8 class. We learned about GPS, how it works and what it does, and students also learned about traditional uses of plants with Elder Joseph S. Sutherland. We traveled to the Youth Site, where ceremonies and gatherings are often held, and students used their GPS units to mark the waypoints of these plants out on the land. They also pointed out rabbit tracks, a few rogue “mush cranberries” and various structures as we were walking – check out our My Maps below to follow our tracks! #CreeGeo #MushYouth

Peetabeck: Fort Albany Youth Site My Maps

Screenshot 2018-10-16 18.39.48

Google Tour Builder: A Virtual Tour of Three Mushkegowuk First Nations Communities

I’m currently taking a course called Constructivism Strategies for E-Learning as part of my master of educational technology at UBC. We were tasked to host a “Research Cafe” for our colleagues on UBC’s Canvas LMS by designing an online learning environment. My topic was “Virtual Field Trips in a Virtual Learning Environment”, although it could also have been Virtual Field Trips as a Virtual Learning Environment. I used inquiry and collaborative learning as the basis of my cafe, and hopefully provided a space for both of these to occur through the use of map listings, a multimedia virtual field trip and discussion fora where peers collaborated with each other and asked questions based on their prior and current understandings/knowledge. My chosen framework was grounded in Baviskar et. al’s (2009) research which outlined four key elements for constructivist learning: 1) eliciting prior knowledge; 2) creating cognitive dissonance; 3) applying new learning; and 4) reflecting on the learning.

Thank you to Roxanne Metlin, Ed Sutherland, and Wilma Williams for providing audio for parts of the tour!

Click here to visit Kashechewan, Taykwa Tagamou and Chapleau Cree First Nations in Tour Builder (best viewed in Chrome).

You can also click on the hamburger menu at the upper RH corner and choose “Open in Earth” to open in Google Earth:

OpeninEarth

GoogleEarthTourBuilder
Google Tour Builder

References

Baviskar, S. N., Hartle, R. T., & Whitney, T. (2009). Essential criteria to characterize constructivist teaching: Derived from a review of the literature and applied to five constructivist-teaching method articles. International Journal of Science Education, 31(4), 541-550. doi:10.1080/09500690701731121

Walk With Us visiting Taykwa Tagamou Nation June 23, 2018

Walk With Us will be visiting Taykwa Tagamou Nation on Saturday, June 23rd to capture Street View imagery of the community! We’ll be meeting in front of the band office at 1:00 pm, so if you’re in the neighborhood, please say hello and learn more about the Walk With Us project. WWU thanks Chief Bruce Archibald and TTN for hosting us! Stay tuned for Street View and a virtual tour.

Walk With Us Poster_ TTN June 23, 2018

For more information about Walk With Us: @WWUProject   #walkwithusproject

For more information about CreeGeo Education: CreeGeoEd FB Page

 

Sketchnoting the concept of Knowledge

I’m currently enrolled in ETEC 530: Constructivist Strategies for E-Learning through the UBC MET program. We are learning about knowledge, and how it’s constructed and acquired, through a philosophical lens held up by Professor Duncan Pritchard at the University of Edinburgh. The following post was one of our discussion post assignments.

Method:

My task for this particular week was to choose an online concept mapping tool in order to draw a visual representation of linkages between the posts in What is knowledge? My ideas forum, with the readings from Duncan Pritchard. Since I knew I wanted to create a sketchnote and I don’t currently own a stylus to draw on a tablet, I opted for a no-to-low tech option for this assignment. Yes, I used paper and pens. I did use an online word cloud generator by Jason Davies in order to begin my word associations, and this acted as a digital springboard for me. I take word clouds with a grain of salt, as these generators don’t take context into consideration.

 

I started with the word “knowledge” in the middle of the page. Then, I thought of a brain, so I drew a brain beside the word knowledge. I remembered when I taught the Human Organ Systems unit in Grade 5 Science years ago, and proceeded to split the brain into four parts: Frontal, Parietal, Occipital and Temporal, and labeled and colour-coded them. Then I refreshed my memory (activating my temporal lobe) and researched the parts of the brain, and ended up organizing my canvas into four parts. I thought that I could link Pritchard’s teachings through this type of lens and go from there.
Taking notes by sketching comes naturally to me, and I feel that I organically made linkages because it was a natural process (not to speak in circles). If you’d like to dig deeper into the wonderful world of sketchnoting, I just found this article entitled “50+ Awesome Resources to Create Visual Notes, Graphic Recordings & Sketchnotes”. It is an amazing curation of resources, even if you’ve been sketchnoting for a while! I also love Sylvia Duckworth.

Materials:

Gelly Roll 06 pen (found this one while in Japantown in San Francisco and it is my absolute favourite gel pen)

Sketchbook (mine is a Five-Star Scrap Book with heavyweight paper)

Mr. Sketch markers (for pops of colour and scent!!; although these will bleed through the paper)

Sharpie pens (multiple colours)

Computer with a copy-paste Google Doc of my fellow students’ responses in the What is Knowledge? My Ideas forum, as well as the word cloud I used to generate linkages based on frequently used words/ideas

My sketchnote:

References

Cherry, Kendra, and Steven Gans. “Learn the Basic Structures of Brain Anatomy.” Verywell Mind, Verywellmind, 24 Feb. 2018, http://www.verywellmind.com/the-anatomy-of-the-brain-2794895.